Wednesday, June 20, 2012

How to Get the Great Gatsby Look

I am SO excited for this!! I love the lavish, exaggerated glamour Baz Luhrmann has infused into it.

A post I did 2 months ago on Great Gatsby style was so popular I decided to do another version of it
because I am a history nerd that also loves beauty and fashion, and I am eagerly awaiting the release of the new Gatsby on Christmas this year (why do we have to wait so long?!?!).

Of course we would all love to have wardrobe's time warped from the 1920s, but it just isn't possible.
So opt for the simple (and cheap) ways to incorporate Gatsby into your summer style!
Try some vintage sunglasses and a cute fedora with any outfit. It is absolutely wonderful how the fedora has made a comeback, and you can find them almost anywhere. I especially love Target's versions.





The plush purple velvet here is so flapper-esque, as is the ribbon and flower detail.

Just adding ribbons or flowers to your clothes/purse/hair can help give you this look.


Another quick way to sneak in some Roaring Twenties is with a spangly hair piece, whether it is a jeweled headband or sparkly stick you jam into your hair knot.

 The thing to remember about dressing in Gatsby style are the
DETAILS.

Back then clothing and accessories were a source of pride, a piece of art you wore on your body.
We don't value that sort of unique craftsmanship anymore.
So if you see anything that looks one-of-a-kind, vintage, or just has marvelous features, snatch it up or create your own version.

And now makeup...
The 1920s look is simple and glamorous. You don't want your face to compete with the jazz of your outfit, so stick to black eyeliner (winged a bit if you like) and pink or red lipstick.
The Gatsby aura is all about clear, pale skin with a rosy glow and smoky eyes, accented lips.
They favored thin, highly arched eyebrows and a cupid's bow lipstick style. Observe...


As for hair, a straight or curly bob is spot-on.

The Marcel Wave was highly popular during this time,

 and is similar to what we call "finger waves" or subtle crimping today.

You can use bobby pins or a curling iron to get the look.




More tips and tricks:

Jewelry:
PEARLS

Long strands of pearls, knotted if you like.
And don't neglect to wear them as earrings!
If you want to incorporate flapper style into your jewelry, make sure it is high quality, sparkly, and classy. Any baubles that dangle are perfectamundo. Lockets are also a great option.
And keep an eye out for ART DECO pieces.  Art deco rocks in all forms, but is particularly bomb in the jewelry arena! Strong colors and rhinestones in geometric shapes.

Gloves and feathers and lovely touches as well.

And now...
to the dress.

The term "flapper" originates from the style of dress that become irresistibly popular during the 1920s, helped along by Coco Chanel's designs of course.
The dresses were looser and many of them didn't require corsets, and girls stopped wearing petticoats with them, so when they danced (like the Charleston), their loose dresses would FLAP up around their knees, showing quite a scandalous amount of skin! And many of them were silk and were as substantial as a slip. A very sexy look indeed.
Add some spangles to the gown (beads, sequins, brooches) and you will truly be the BEE'S KNEES (if you are going for '20s style, throw this term around a lot).










These dresses are absolutely gorgeous--
as a rule of thumb, if it makes noise when you move in it, mission accomplished.
Just remember that flappers were scandalous enough with their short hair, flippant lifestyles, and dresses revealing their knees--so they tended not to show too much cleavage.
If you're going for a lower cut dress, aim for something a bit longer in the legs.

Fringe is a must, and as mentioned above, look for the DETAILS.
Don't shy away from anything too outlandish.

Flappers were fashion revolutionaries.


Below you will find some more bits and pieces for inspiration. And if you're still in a muddle, watch Chicago, a great favorite of mine.
The stage ambiance is incredible and the costumes, numbers, sets...love love love. And the history of it--the murderesses of Chicago (yes, read Douglas Perry's book The Girls of Murder City) is so very rich.
It is a rare day I don't catch myself humming "Cell Block Tango" under my breath.

Remember to keep your purses small (not the bags you can fit a baby in that are so trendy nowadays) and don't shy away from the menswear look!
The 1920s were a snazzy time for both genders. Just keep it tailored.

And drink Manhattan cocktails!






Terms to Use:
Applesauce (as an expletive);
Beat It!;
Atta Boy;
Swell;
Swanky;
Tomato (a female);
Whoopee (a good time);
Sap (a moron);
Pinch (arrest);

On the level (real, legit); Scrooched zozzled, ossified, fried to the hat (all these terms mean DRUNK); kisser (mouth); Iron (a motorbike);
Hard-boiled (a tough guy); Dry up (shut up, go away); Dead soldier (empty beer bottle);
Clam (a dollar); Bump off (kill).



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